1720 Herman Moll Large Antique Pre Revolutionary Map of France in Provinces

1720 Herman Moll Large Antique Pre Revolutionary Map of France in Provinces

1720 Herman Moll Large Antique Pre Revolutionary Map of France in Provinces

1720 Herman Moll Large Antique Pre Revolutionary Map of France in Provinces

Moll , Herman 1654 1732. 39 1/2in x 25in (1.00m x 630mm). (A) Very Good Condition. This very large beautifully hand coloured original copper-plate engraved antique map of France by Herman Moll was published in 1720 in the atlas The World Described, or a New and Correct Sett of Maps by John Bowles, Thomas Bowles, Philip Overton & John King of London. In the 18th century many large-scale maps were published by the likes of John Senex and Herman Moll, this trend continued until the end of private mapping in the early 19th century when it was replaced by Ordnance Survey maps. Paper thickness and quality: – Heavy and stable Paper color : – off white Age of map color: – Original Colors used: – Yellow, green, blue, pink General color appearance: – Authentic Paper size: – 39 1/2in x 25in (1.00m x 630mm) Plate size: – 39 1/2in x 25in (1.00m x 630mm) Margins: – Min 1/2in (12mm). Margins: – Age toning, bottom margin extended from plate-mark Plate area: – Light age toning along folds Verso: – Re-enforced along folds. Background: The Carolingian dynasty ruled France until 987, when Hugh Capet, Duke of France and Count of Paris, was crowned King of the Franks. His descendantsthe Capetians, the House of Valois, and the House of Bourbonprogressively unified the country through wars and dynastic inheritance into the Kingdom of France, which was fully declared in 1190 by Philip II Augustus. The French nobility played a prominent role in most Crusades in order to restore Christian access to the Holy Land. French knights made up the bulk of the steady flow of reinforcements throughout the two-hundred-year span of the Crusades, in such a fashion that the Arabs uniformly referred to the crusaders as Franj caring little whether they really came from France. The French Crusaders also imported the French language into the Levant, making French the base of the lingua franca litt. Frankish language of the Crusader states. French knights also made up the majority in both the Hospital and the Temple orders. The latter, in particular, held numerous properties throughout France and by the 13th century were the principal bankers for the French crown, until Philip IV annihilated the order in 1307. The Albigensian Crusade was launched in 1209 to eliminate the heretical Cathars in the southwestern area of modern-day France. In the end, the Cathars were exterminated and the autonomous County of Toulouse was annexed into the crown lands of France. Later kings expanded their domain to cover over half of modern continental France, including most of the north, centre and west of France. Meanwhile, the royal authority became more and more assertive, centred on a hierarchically conceived society distinguishing nobility, clergy, and commoners. From the 11th century, the House of Plantagenet, the rulers of the County of Anjou, succeeded in establishing its dominion over the surrounding provinces of Maine and Touraine, then progressively built an empire that spanned from England to the Pyrenees and covering half of modern France. Tensions between the kingdom of France and the Plantagenet empire would last a hundred years, until Philip Augustus of France conquered between 1202 and 1214 most of the continental possessions of the empire, leaving England and Aquitaine to the Plantagenets. Following the Battle of Bouvines, the Angevin court retreated to England, but persistent CapetianPlantagenet rivalry would paved the way for another conflict. Charles IV the Fair died without an heir in 1328. Under the rules of the Salic law the crown of France could not pass to a woman nor could the line of kingship pass through the female line. Accordingly, the crown passed to Philip of Valois, a cousin of Charles, rather than through the female line to Charles nephew, Edward of Plantagenet, who would soon become Edward III of England. During the reign of Philip of Valois, the French monarchy reached the height of its medieval power. Philips seat on the throne was contested by Edward III of England and in 1337, on the eve of the first wave of the Black Death, England and France went to war in what would become known as the Hundred Years War. The exact boundaries changed greatly with time, but French landholdings of the English Kings remained extensive for decades. With charismatic leaders, such as Joan of Arc and La Hire, strong French counterattacks won back English continental territories. Like the rest of Europe, France was struck by the Black Death; half of the 17 million population of France died. The French Renaissance saw a spectacular cultural development and the first standardisation of the French language, which would become the official language of France and the language of Europes aristocracy. It also saw a long set of wars, known as the Italian Wars, between France and the House of Habsburg. French explorers, such as Jacques Cartier or Samuel de Champlain, claimed lands in the Americas for France, paving the way for the expansion of the First French colonial empire. The rise of Protestantism in Europe led France to a civil war known as the French Wars of Religion, where, in the most notorious incident, thousands of Huguenots were murdered in the St. Bartholomews Day massacre of 1572. The Wars of Religion were ended by Henry IVs Edict of Nantes, which granted some freedom of religion to the Huguenots. The war cost France 300,000 casualties. Under Louis XIII, the energetic Cardinal Richelieu promoted the centralisation of the state and reinforced the royal power by disarming domestic power holders in the 1620s. He systematically destroyed castles of defiant lords and denounced the use of private violence (dueling, carrying weapons, and maintaining private army). By the end of 1620s, Richelieu established the royal monopoly of force as the doctrine. During Louis XIVs minority and the regency of Queen Anne and Cardinal Mazarin, a period of trouble known as the Fronde occurred in France. This rebellion was driven by the great feudal lords and sovereign courts as a reaction to the rise of royal absolute power in France. The monarchy reached its peak during the 17th century and the reign of Louis XIV. By turning powerful feudal lords into courtiers at the Palace of Versailles, Louis XIVs personal power became unchallenged. Remembered for his numerous wars, he made France the leading European power. France became the most populous country in Europe and had tremendous influence over European politics, economy, and culture. French became the most-used language in diplomacy, science, literature and international affairs, and remained so until the 20th century. France obtained many overseas possessions in the Americas, Africa and Asia. Louis XIV also revoked the Edict of Nantes, forcing thousands of Huguenots into exile. Under Louis XV, Louis XIVs great-grandson, France lost New France and most of its Indian possessions after its defeat in the Seven Years War (175663). Its European territory kept growing, however, with notable acquisitions such as Lorraine (1766) and Corsica (1770). An unpopular king, Louis XVs weak rule, his ill-advised financial, political and military decisions as well as the debauchery of his court discredited the monarchy, which arguably paved the way for the French Revolution 15 years after his death. Louis XVI, Louis XVs grandson, actively supported the Americans, who were seeking their independence from Great Britain realised in the Treaty of Paris (1783). The financial crisis aggravated by Frances involvement in the American Revolutionary War was one of many contributing factors to the French Revolution. Much of the Enlightenment occurred in French intellectual circles, and major scientific breakthroughs and inventions, such as the discovery of oxygen (1778) and the first hot air balloon carrying passengers (1783), were achieved by French scientists. French explorers, such as Bougainville and Lapérouse, took part in the voyages of scientific exploration through maritime expeditions around the globe. The Enlightenment philosophy, in which reason is advocated as the primary source for legitimacy and authority, undermined the power of and support for the monarchy and helped pave the way for the French Revolution. Moll , Herman 1654 1732 Moll was a London cartographer, engraver, and publisher. Molls exact place of origin is unknown, although his birth year is generally accepted to be the year 1654. He moved to England in 1678 and opened a book and map store in London. He produced maps from his studies of the work of other cartographers. Due to Molls important work in Dutch cartography and the fact that he undertook a journey in his late years on behalf of the Netherlands, it is assumed he originated from Amsterdam or Rotterdam. The name, Moll occurred not only in the Netherlands however but also in the north German area, which may suggest a German origin. Dennis Reinhartzs biography assumed that Moll came from Bremen, and other more recent works assume Germany as well. Moll produced his earliest maps from studying cartographers such as John Senex and Emanuel Bowen. From 1688 he had his own shop in Vanleys Court in Londons Blackfriars. Between 1691 and 1710 his business was located at the corner of Spring Gardens and Charing Cross, and he finally moved along the River Thames to Beech Street where he remained until his death. In the 1690s, Moll worked mainly as an engraver for Christopher Browne, Robert Morden and Lea, in whose business he was also involved. During this time he also published his first major independent work, the Thesaurus Geographicus. The success of this work likely influenced his decision to start publishing his own maps. In 1701 he published A System of Geography, the first of his own publishing. Although it contained no fundamental changes in the presentation of his previous work, it helped him to assert himself as a freelance cartographer. Over the years, the work itself as well as individual maps were of influence on other publishers, as they were frequently copied and re-issued. In the years that followed he brought out several volumes including Fifty-six new and accurate maps of Great Britain, a book of maps of the British Isles. Then came The Compleat Geographer which was an update to A System of Geography. He issued forty-two monochrome maps designed without the usual text, as by not using his usual colors he could produce them at significantly less expense than comparable works, and went through many new editions. In 1711 he began his Atlas Geographus, which appeared in monthly deliveries from 1711 to 1717, and eventually comprised five volumes. This included a full geographical representation of the world in color maps and illustrations. As with his earlier works, the Atlas Geographus was eagerly copied and imitated. In 1710 he began producing artfully crafted pocket globes. These were each a pair of globes, with the larger, hinged celestial globe encircled a smaller globe. On the latter he often included the route of Dampiers circumnavigation. These globes are very rare today. In 1715 Moll issued The World Described, a collection of thirty large, double-sided maps which saw numerous editions. In these maps Molls skill as an engraver is particularly clear. The series included two of the most famous Moll maps: A new and exact map of the dominions of the King of Great Britain and To The Right Honorable John Lord Sommers… This Map of North America According To Ye Newest and Most Exact Observations. These were distinctive for their elaborate cartouches and images, and are known respectively as the Beaver Map and the Codfish Map. As with much of his work, Moll used these maps to publicize and support British policy and regional claims throughout the world. The Codfish Map shows in its cartouches a scene from the cod fisheries off Newfoundland. Since the beginning of the 16th Century the cod fishery there was an important economic factor for the European colonial powers. At the time of issue, the battle over fishing rights was one of the central points of contention in the North American policy of France and England. Moll labeled the Atlantic Ocean as the Sea of the British Empire and stressed that the British claims to fishing rights off the coast of Newfoundland. In a West India map from the same series, he wrote in the southwestern corner of Carolina, the words Spanish Fort Deserted and Good Ground. On many of its North American maps – including at the Beaver Map – he drew particular attention to major ports streets, because he knew that was a sufficient infrastructure detail, communicating that for the further expansion of English is very important. Pritchard argues that the Beaver Map was one of the first and most important cartographic documents relating to the ongoing dispute between France and Great Britain over boundaries separating their respective American colonies… The map was the primary exponent of the British position during the period immediately following the Treaty of Utrecht in 1713. His maps were also used by other powers to attempt support for their claims. One of Molls maps of the island of Newfoundland, published in the 1680s, showed Pointe Riche, the southern limit of the French Shore to be situated at 47°40 north latitude. In 1763 the French attempted to use this map to establish their claim to the west coast of Newfoundland and Labrador, arguing that Point Riche and Cape Ray were the same headland. Governor Hugh Palliser and Captain James Cook found evidence to refute Molls claim and in 1764 the French accepted the placement of Pointe Riche near Port au Choix. However, all political considerations aside, Molls maps were in his lifetime and after very influential, and are still among the most sought after aesthetic engravings in the history of cartography. Moll was quite involved in the contemporary intellectual life. He was friendly and acquainted with Robert Boyle, Robert Hooke and William Dampier, both socially and likely through the Royal Society. His relationship with Dampier, especially, was mutually very beneficial. Daniel Defoe was another contemporary with whom Moll exchanges ideas, and for whom he provided illustrations and maps. Another acquaintance, Jonathan Swift, went so far as to include him in his famous book, Gullivers Travels, having Lemuel Gulliver remark in chapter four, part eleven: I arrived in seven hours to the south-east point of New Holland. This confirmed me in the opinion I have long entertained, that the maps and charts place this country at least three degrees more to the east than it really is; which I thought I communicated many years ago to my worthy friend, Mr. Herman Moll, and gave him my reasons for it, Although he has rather chosen to follow other authors. Moll died on 22 September 1732, as noted in his obituary in Gentlemans Magazine. Please note all items auctioned are genuine, we do not sell reproductions. A Certificate of Authenticity (COA) can be issued on request. What is an Antique Map. The word Antique in the traditional sense refers to an item that is more than a hundred years old. The majority of antique maps for sale today come from books or atlases and have survived due to the protection offered by the hardback covers. The first thing to determine when staring a collection or purchasing an item, is what is important to you. Most collectors prefer to build their collections around a theme. You may decide to collect maps from one region or country, charting its development through time. Similarly you could collect maps of one particular period in time, by type i. Sea or celestial charts or by cartographer. The collector might also want to consider the theme of cartographical misconceptions such as California as an island or Australia as Terra Australis or the Great Southern Land. The subject is so wide that any would-be-collector has almost endless possibilities to find his own little niche within the field, and thereby build a rewarding collection. Starting a collection & pricing. Pricing is based on a number of different factors, the most important of which is regional. In any series of maps the most valuable are usually the World Map and the America/North America. The World because it is usually the most decorative and America because it has the strongest regional market. Other factors that come into play re: price is rarity, age, size, historical importance, decorative value (colour) and overall condition and quality of paper it is printed on. As specialised dealers, we frequently work with first time map buyers who are just starting their collection. Classical Images was founded 1998 and has built an excellent reputation for supplying high quality original antiquarian maps, historical atlases, antique books and prints. We carry an extensive inventory of antiquarian collectibles from the 15th to 19th century. Our collection typically includes rare books and decorative antique maps and prints by renowned cartographers, authors and engravers. Specific items not listed may be sourced on request. Classical Images adheres to the Codes of Ethics outlined by the Antiquarian Booksellers Association of America (ABAA). We are a primarily an online based enterprise, however our inventory may be viewed by appointment. Track Page Views With. Auctiva’s FREE Counter. The item “1720 Herman Moll Large Antique Pre Revolutionary Map of France in Provinces” is in sale since Saturday, March 14, 2020. This item is in the category “Antiques\Maps, Atlases & Globes\Europe Maps”. The seller is “searching01″ and is located in Ivanhoe, VIC. This item can be shipped worldwide.
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Herman Moll A New Map Of Ye North Parts of America Claimed By France 1729

Herman Moll A New Map Of Ye North Parts of America Claimed By France 1729

Herman Moll A New Map Of Ye North Parts of America Claimed By France 1729

Herman Moll A New Map Of Ye North Parts of America Claimed By France 1729

Herman Moll A New Map Of Ye North Parts of America Claimed By France 1729. Includes French and British Forts in the US and Great Lakes regions. The western region of the US is marked as “Parts Unknown” Measurements: 9″ x 11 3/4″ (not including frame). Condition: The map is brown. It has not been pulled out of it’s frame. Full margins appears to be present. Not sticking to glass. Payments must be made within 4 days. Auctiva offers Free Image Hosting and Editing. Auctiva gets you noticed! Track Page Views With. Auctiva’s FREE Counter. The item “Herman Moll A New Map Of Ye North Parts of America Claimed By France 1729″ is in sale since Wednesday, May 30, 2018. This item is in the category “Antiques\Maps, Atlases & Globes\North America Maps”. The seller is “pburkelakeland” and is located in Lewisville, Texas. This item can be shipped worldwide.
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